PBC offers an extensive range of units to equip its students for the ministry outcomes that they desire.  Under each of the categories below is a brief description of each unit offered by PBC.

study ready Units

Many people find the idea of tertiary study overwhelming. This may be particularly true for school leavers or those returning to studies after a number of years. At Perth Bible College we actively support students in their studies by offering two Study Ready units: Effective Academic Communication (Semester 1) and Theological Thinking & Writing (Semester 2).

These units focus on essential academic communication skills and helps students to:

  • Develop good question analysis strategies and research approaches,
  • Use effective reading plans and writing styles,
  • Develop reliable note-taking strategies, and
  • Performing public speaking with confidence.

Students usually link one of these units with one of their core subjects. Information supplied in each Study Ready unit, directly relates to a student’s chosen core subject’s assessment items, thereby assisting them in reaching the required academic standard. Individual assistance in areas of particular need is provided as required.

New Testament Units

New Testament A – Gospels & Acts NT501, NT801
This New Testament unit is exciting because it provides an opportunity to seriously engage with the Biblical text. Students will gain an insight into the background, purpose and overall message of the four Gospels, and Acts, introducing us to the person of Jesus, the kingdom of God and the mission of the church.This is a core unity. For any person involved in ministry it is important to know the Bible and its overall message well. But this cannot be done unless we understand the story of Jesus, both in the light of the meta-narrative of Scripture and in the historical context out of which the story unfolds. Students will discover that this narrative is not only objective, but also intersects their personal lives, as the reality of a risen Saviour calls them to be participants in the continuation of a story that brings life and hope. Not only will students grow in confidence by coming to grips with God’s bigger picture, but this unit will also provide an open door for further in-depth studies.
New Testament B – Letters NT502, NT802
New Testament B (Life Before God) is an exciting unit because it provides an opportunity for students to seriously engage with the Biblical text. Students will gain insight into the background, purpose, structure and themes of the New Testament letters, and understand various methodologies of studying these booksFor any person involved in ministry, it is important to know the New Testament adequately, because Christian ministry is based on the authority of the Scriptures. This unit will have a life-changing impact on the students. They will be exposed to the teaching of Paul and the other Apostles within the overall story of how the Gospel reached different parts of the world as well as in the context of dealing with problems and persecutions.An overview of these New Testament books also opens the door for further in-depth study. Students will grow in their faith and understanding as they learn the New Testament, and they will also be exposed to topics that will stir their interest for additional research.
New Testament Studies A NT601, NT701
The Gospel writers used the stories (narratives) of the live and ministry of Jesus to portrait to us that Jesus came to earth, not only as the awaited Messiah, but also as the Son of God. It is through these stories we see how Jesus proclaims the ‘Kingdom of God’, shows His power through miracles, teaches the crowds through parables and accomplish victory over death and sin through the cross.In this unit we will look at the Gospels, and in particular, the Gospel according to Matthew; his composition of the text, the different genres he uses and how we can understand the text today, in order to communicate it to others. We will exercise our exegetical and hermeneutical skills and apply it to a relevant target audience.
New Testament Studies B NT602, NT702

The letters of John are quite different from the other letters in the New Testament. At the same time, they are closely related to the Gospel of John, making it the only Gospel that has letters related to it.

In this unit we will look at the letters of John (predominantly 1 John) from different perspectives. What make the letters of John unique? Who is the author of John? Who was his audience and what were the possible issues John wished to address? Most important, how do we analyse and interpret these letters? We will also ask whether the message John’s letters are relevant to the life of the modern church and in what way.  

“I write these things to you who believe in the name of the Son of God so that you may know that you have eternal life” (1 John 5:13).

Old Testament Units

Old Testament A – Narrative OT501, OT801

Although most of the Old Testament is written as a story or narrative, it is seldom read as such. Thus, the purpose of this unit is to look how we should read Genesis to Nehemiah as a narrative.We will start of by looking at what a narrative is, how it functions and how it should be read. With this as a basis, be will be looking at the ‘big picture’ narrative of the Old Testament and then start to focus on the building blogs that make up this narrative.With the author as our guide, we will enter into the world of the narrative. Through his eyes, we will meet different characters and experience another world. We will also look at the interaction between the characters and in the process learn to know the main character better – who he is and what he is like. Furthermore, we will also ask how the author, through his narratives, draws his audience into his story-world and change their worldview.

Having engaged with the characters in the story and experienced another world we will hopefully leave the narrative-world with a different perspective on God and the world we live in. The hope is fully the narrative would have fulfilled its purpose through the fact that it changes our worldview and us.

Old Testament B – Life Before God OT502, OT802
In OT501, we look at the story of God’s people. In this unit, we will be looking at life in God’s presence. What does it mean to live as God’s people in every aspect of our lives?Ancient Israel expressed their life before God predominantly in the form of poetry. In the prophetic literature we here God’s admonishing and comforting voice. In the Psalms, we hear the voice of God’s people in their heartache, suffering, pain, hope, joy, worship and celebration. In the wisdom literature, the sages of old give direction as to how God’s people should live wisely in this world.Studying these books of the Bible gives us, as God’s people, the opportunity to hear his voice anew. It also gives us a voice to express ourselves in all our needs and joys.
Old Testament Studies A OT601, OT701

More than a third of the Old Testament consists of stories – narratives. These stories are not cold hard facts communicated in a dull fashion. They were told around the family fire and in such a way that it would be remembered for generations to come. They were fashioned to make the children sit up and listen, knowing that these stories about their ancestor’s journey with God are also their story – knowing that these stories and this journey continue in and through them.These stories became part of our canon – God’s Word to us. It seems logic then – should we wish to understand God and his Word better – to take narratives, the way they function and how they are interpreted, serious.According to Long (1994, p. 43): “an increased appreciation of the literary mechanisms of a text—how a story is told—often becomes the avenue of greater insight into the theological, religious and even historical significance of the text—what the story means.”

Knowing how stories work, what they wish to achieve and how they wish to achieve it, might bring us to a better understanding of God and his dealings with his creation.

Old Testament Studies B OT602, OT702

This unit looks at biblical poetry as literature and how one should go about interpreting it. Crucially, this unit also endeavours to ask the relevance of the Bible’s poetic texts in the life of the church and our society – does it still have anything to say to us and does it still mean anything to us.

Biblical poetry’s significance is to be found in both its literary beauty and its universality. In many ways it deals with the reality of the everyday lives of human beings – sorrow, grief, opposition, despair, struggles with sin, joy, awe, human passions etc. On the other hand, it was the prophets’ genre of choice to bring God’s word to his people.

As a distinctive genre, biblical poetry places a great demand on the interpreter. So, the big question this unit endeavours to answer is, “How should one go about interpreting these important texts in a responsible and accountable manner while still appreciating them as works of literary art?”

Through biblical poetry God spoke/speaks to us, and in biblical poetry we also find the words to speak, along with our spiritual ancestors, to God.

Interpretation units

Interpreting the Bible HE501, HE801
  • How do we apply the Bible today?
  • What does this passage really mean?
  • How should I approach the Bible?

These are common questions for anyone who reads God’s Word. This unit not only helps to answer these questions but also gives a foundation for all biblical study. It equips students to analyse and interpret the Bible responsibly and creatively by bridging the gap between the world of the Bible and our modern world.

In this unit we look at different approaches to Scripture, the background of scripture, how we as interpreters are involved in the process of constructing meaning, and how we can effectively apply the message of an ancient book to our world and lives today.

This unit lies at the heart of all Biblical and systematic theological studies. As such it thus integrates with all New Testament, Old Testament and systematic theological subjects.

Bible Language Units

Greek A and Greek B BL701, BL702
The old expression: “That is all Greek to me,” has convinced a lot of people that Greek must be a very difficult language to speak. Greek grammar, however, has a very logical and exact structure, allowing the reader to analyse the text with amazing precision. It is exactly this which makes the study of Greek so exciting and worthwhile.In this first level course students are taught the fundamental grammatical structure of Koine Greek and its vocabulary. Along with this students are also introduced to Greek language tools that are available to help them analyse the text more quickly. This is important as time constraints often force ministers to by-pass analysis of the Greek text in their sermon preparation, resulting in poorer exegesis.Greek is very important for an in-depth analysis and understanding of the New Testament. It, thus, is foundational for students wishing to continue their studies of the New Testament on a post-graduate level.
Hebrew A BL703
Biblical Hebrew is the language in which most of the Old Testament was originally written, and which the ancient Israelites spoke. Understanding and being equipped to use Biblical Hebrew opens up a new world into a deeper understanding of the Old Testament. Hebrew A will introduce students to the basic principals of Biblical Hebrew. It will give students an overview of the Hebrew language, its grammar and structure and its use in interpretation. Students will also be introduced to different Hebrew language tools that they can use to help them exegete the Hebrew text. This unit forms the first building block to prepare students for Utilising Hebrew Language Tools B where the focus would be more on engaging with the Hebrew text itself.
Hebrew B BL704
In this second part of Biblical Hebrew our focus would be to use the knowledge gained in Hebrew A to actually engage with the Hebrew text of the Old Testament. In this unit we will not only further our knowledge of the Hebrew language, its grammar and structure and its use in interpretation, but also look at translation techniques. Furthermore, we will continue to explore different Hebrew language tools and software we can use to translate and exegete the Hebrew text. The main goal of the unit is to be equipped to actually use the original language of the Old Testament for ministry.

Theology and Church History Units

Introduction to Theology TH501, TH801
Introduction to Theology provides the student with the big picture of God’s involvement with mankind and the world and an opportunity to consider carefully the foundation of their personal faith. We consider important questions such as:

  • What is truth and how can we understand and know God?
  • Who is God and how are we designed in his image?
  • What is the effect of sin on God’s design for creation?
  • Who was Jesus and how does his life and work affect us today?
  • Who is the Holy Spirit and how is he involved with us now?
  • What is the charter of the church in the world today and what is our unique role within it?
  • How will this world end and what lies beyond?

This subject takes a person’s Biblical knowledge which is often compartmentalised and places it in a broad theological framework. This allows students to think more clearly and wider on all sorts of issues that present in ministry and everyday life.

The subject doesn’t only detail and describe the foundations of the Christian faith but places the major theological themes of the Bible into the living drama of a gracious covenantal God. This provides the student with a clearer perspective of God’s involvement with them in everyday life.

Christ and The Holy Spirit TH601, TH701

To think about Christ and the Holy Spirit is to come to a place of awe and worship. It is here that we are able to catch a glimpse into the very depths of God’s own being. It is here that we are brought to a deeper understanding of ourselves. It is here that we see the relationship between the Holy God of love and sinful humanity brought to its surprising climax.

For everybody wishing to be in the service of the gospel, this unit is of supreme importance. Unless we understand who Jesus is and the full significance of what he has done for us, we will never experience the full richness of the gospel of Christ. And unless we understand the relationship between Christ and the Spirit we will not be able to clearly discern God’s continuing work in the church and our lives.

This unit will provide foundational knowledge on which to practically build our lives and the church, in worshipful service to God.

The Church: Engaging with the World TH602, TH702
Is this another ‘How to reach your neighbours with the gospel course?
Not quite. There are many good courses out there that can help Christians build bridges to speak to non-Christians about their faith. This course wants to go further. It wants to equip students to think through the deeper dimensions of what it means to become and be a Christian in the light of the whole message of the Bible.What are some of these ‘deeper issues’ that we will be looking at?
We need to understand the world, the church and the message of the gospel in their dynamic interaction with each other.When it comes to the world we will be focusing on analysing people’s expected disposition towards the world.They entail things like predestination and God’s election; the definition, role and place of faith; who we are as humans – free to choose for God or doomed in our sinfulness. Then there are also further aspects such as the role of the Holy Spirit in our salvation etc.What about the context in which we are to proclaim the gospel?
Students will be focusing on a context in which they are interested in – such as cross cultural communication, youth, pastoral etc.
The Church: Its Essence and Expression TH603, TH703

In this unit we will be exploring both the essence and the practices of the church. People often feel hurt by the church, encountering unexpected sins ranging from jealousy, small mindedness, selfishness and hard-heartedness to even coarse sexual sins. At the same time the church can be a place of wonderful blessing and support for many, where they experience the reality of Christ in a special way. This begs the question: What is the church really? How should we understand this very human organisation which also claims to represent the body of Christ on earth?

We will be dealing with these two dimensions of the church to uncover both the essence of the church and the way in which this is expressed or possibly not expressed through the church’s actions.

The Church: Its History and Theology CH601, CH701
An in depth examination and evaluation of three selected areas of church history over 2100 years. These areas are the development of traditions, the growth of theology and the unity/disunity displayed in the church in that time.

Christian Formation

Personal and Ministry Formation  A PM501, PM801

People decide to study at a Bible college for many different reasons and therefore enter the study of theology with a range of different expectations, assumptions and ideas about what studying theology will be like and what it may “do” to them in the process.

For many students, there is also an expectation that the experience of study will be a transformational one, where they may gain a clearer idea of God’s plan for their life, or where they are shaped and equipped for Christian ministry.

This unit is designed to begin to explore Christian theological study, outline key elements of theological study which underpin PBC’s educational philosophy and introduce students to a theological posture which can enable them to develop as life-long theological learners. This includes a foundational understanding of the benefits and limits of theological studies.

Personal and Ministry Formation B PM502, PM802

A key text for Christians is Matthew 28:18-20:

Then Jesus came to them [the disciples] and said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.”

As a people who are responding to the call to make disciples it is important to reflect on what it means to “make disciples”. This passage speaks of communication and transformation empowered by Jesus presence until the end of the age.

This unit is designed to engage with the areas of communication and transformation providing a foundation for situating Christian faith within a context of a communicative and transformative God who by grace enables us to join with Him in being agents of change within the Church and the world.

Christian Education

Study Skills CE501, CE801

This unit is designed to initialise a solid foundation for theological study. It seeks to introduce the tools needed for theological work and for the reflection upon theological practice.

Theological study at the Perth Bible College is comprised of many things, one of those is the academic nature of theological study and the requirements expected of it as a Higher Education provider. This means that students must be conversant with and proficient in the art of theological study. This unit seeks to provide the basic elements required for both of these.

This unit will be linked directly to the assessment outcomes from other units during this semester of study.

Students must complete this foundational course prior to or in conjunction with their first semester of studies

Supervised Field Education  A & B SF601, SF602, SF701, SF702
At Perth Bible College, we believe that academic training that is not thoroughly grounded in the real world of ministry, often leads to the disillusionment and failure of those sent out to serve. Likewise practical skills training without a broad understanding by which the existing status quo may be challenged in the light of the Word of God, in turn, often leads to stagnation and death. Perth Bible College endeavours to combine the highest academic standards with practical training in ministry. For this reason, the field education component is designed to help the student gain clear insights into the practical operations of the church in the world. At the same time, it wishes to instil the necessary skills in the students to not only work for the church, but also on the church. In order for the field work experience to be the most fruitful, students are required to build an ongoing relationship with the pastor and leaders of the church in which they worship. The insights of those who are already doing the work are invaluable. PBC’s Field Education programme together with the supervision of the leaders in the field will provide you with a rich and lasting experience, formative for your future ministry for God.

Pastoral Ministry

Leading Christian Ministry PA601, PA701

Many students who enter church ministry having done a lot of study but are soon asking themselves – “How do I now do church?” In this subject we put it all together, theology, Bible knowledge, and practical skills – and ask the question “How are we going to lead a church?”

Leading a church is more than understanding the Bible and having a good theology. It requires vision, planning, an understanding of organisational dynamics, and the ability in any given context to provide a relevant expression of church while maintaining the core values of what a church should be.

This unit covers areas such as; developing values, visions and strategies, organisational approaches and leadership styles, dealing with change and reviewing progress.

However, the goal of this unit is for each student to have developed their own philosophy and strategy for church ministry so that at the completion of the unit they have a framework for approaching, developing and leading ministry with confidence.

Pastoral Ministry PA602, PA702
Christian ministry demands training in pastoral skills, which are based on a sound theology and which can adapt to the expectations of a variety of ministry contexts. This unit prepares the student practically for the realities of pastoral work in local churches, youth ministries, and a variety of other contexts. By completing this unit students will be able to integrate a knowledge and understanding of the theory and practice of many aspects of Christian ministry. The practical aspects covered include:

  • leading worship services
  • conducting weddings, funerals, dedications, baptisms,
  • pastoral administration
  • leading small groups
  • Elders, board and committee meetings
Preaching PA603, PA703
Preaching is the task of conveying the message of the heart of God in such a way that people today hear God’s message as if it was meant for them. All ministries involve communicating God’s word into one context or another. The skill to communicate God’s word effectively is essential to anyone entering any form of Christian ministry. In this unit we study the Word of God to understand what it means to us today and then consider how we should communicate it into today’s culture for maximum impact.We consider the content, delivery and style needed to construct a message that is faithful to God’s Word and communicates effectively with our target audience. Preaching also affects you. The process of preaching – moving from text to life, serves to promote spiritual growth in the life of the servant of the gospel. The message first needs to touch your heart before you can touch others with the good news.
Pastoral Counselling in a Christian Context CO602, CO702
In this unit students will be embarking on the development and practice of pastoral counselling models shaped by theological thinking, the social sciences and ministry contexts. Through practicum and role-play students will be taught to work through a number of counselling models. After developing the skills to move through the models step by step they will then be encouraged to use the models more flexibly and contextualise the models to specific case studies.
Denominational Polity PA606, PA706
Students entering the pastoral ministry in a local church need to have a good understand of their denominational affiliation and where their denomination fits into the church scene. In this unit students study their denomination’s history, theology and practices which includes topics such as:

  • The History of the denomination
  • The Theological basis and developments
  • The denominational scene
  • Doctrinal distinctives and contemporary developments
  • Governance and administrative structures

Counselling Units

Models for Pastoral Counselling CO601, CO701
Pastoral counselling equips us to engage meaningfully with people in the light of the message of the gospel. This unit will present and explore a number of models that are foundational to the understanding and practice of pastoral counselling. They will include psychlogical, anthropological, theological and counselling theories and models. This will enable students to develop pastoral counselling relationships that are informed, supportive, at times graciously challenging and always hopeful.
Pastoral Counselling in a Christian Context CO602, CO702
In this unit students will be embarking on the development and practice of pastoral counselling models shaped by theological thinking, the social sciences and ministry contexts. Through practicum and role-play students will be taught to work through a number of counselling models. After developing the skills to move through the models step by step they will then be encouraged to use the models more flexibly and contextualise the models to specific case studies.
Pastoral Counselling as Community Care CO603, CO703
Pastoral counselling does not occur in a vacuum. It occurs in a particular context – a church, a school, a para-church organization or in more specialized agencies. It also exists within particular community and cultural contexts. People’s challenges and struggles also occur within particular contexts. This unit will help the student to develop the understanding and skills needed for pastoral counselling and care in his/her personal ministry in its particular community, cultural and practice context.
Marriage and Family CO604, CO704
This unit deals with human sexuality, marriage and family life. Human sexuality sets us apart from animals. It is exactly in the domain of sexuality that the dignity of humanity is the most clearly expressed. Our sexuality calls us beyond ourselves to a complete and intimate relationship with another human being. And it is to an ‘other’ who is radically different from ourselves that we are called. The course also deals with a wide variety of aspects that influence our relationships and marriage such. The first one of these is communication – how to disagree and negotiate with each other without undermining the relationship. We also look at children within the context of the family and how we are all intrinsically shaped by our families and family relationships. Marriage and family issues present an ideal opportunity for us to show how the gospel can affect our lives for the good. Our marriages and family relationships can become showcases of the grace of God. It does not mean that we have to present ourselves as ‘getting it right’ in our marriages and families. But we can meet the world as people who have tasted something very good and thus cannot settle for anything less. The hope that we can offer people in the light of our understanding of God’s vision for our marriages and families can change their lives forever.

Mission Units

Foundational Mission Perspectives MI601, MI701
John Piper states that the Church exists to worship God. But because not all of humankind either knows the Triune God, or worships Him, missions exist to introduce people to their Maker, so that they will worship Him!The Bible is by nature a mission document, describing God’s mission to humankind, sending His Son to reconcile man with God, and also sending His Spirit to show us the way to His Son. The Bible describes God using His church to reach the world with His Gospel. Therefore, we need to understand the biblical foundation of missions before engaging in any other aspect of missions or cross-cultural studies.Building on the biblical foundation of mission, is the theology of mission as well as mission history. These three aspects will be discussed in this unit as a foundation for our understanding of Christian missions.What makes this unit so interesting? The fact that God is the central point of missions must encourage us to engage in His work. Mission is so often seen as an archaic practice destined for the bold, the lonely and the holy. But by understanding God’s mission, we also discover His plan to use the Church (not only certain members of the Church) to go forth and be witnesses to the ends of the earth. And what can be more interesting or exciting than to know that we are God’s co-labourers in His field, and that He wants us to complete that which He began?
Cross Cultural Training MI602, MI702
This unit is an integration of two fields of study – Cross-cultural Communication and Teaching and Learning Studies. It will therefore look at the concepts of culture, worldview and communication, and the understanding of how to communicate effectively in a cross-cultural setting. Then students will learn about the basic theories of teaching and learning, development of training material and the planning, preparing, delivery and evaluation of lessons (all within a cross-cultural context) and put it to the practice.
Christianity and World ReligionsMI603, MI703
Australia has become highly multicultural at all levels of society. It is essential for students seeking to minister, both in Australia and overseas, to gain an awareness of other people’s worldview, religions and cultures in order to develop principles and strategies for relating them and engaging them in dialogue.The aim of this unit is to broaden the student’s understanding of the beliefs and practices of several of the major world religions and the way they are expressed in culture.This unit will explore the differences and similarities between these religions and Christianity and ways in which Christians can relate and witness to people of other faiths in a multicultural, pluralistic society.
Ministry In a Cross Cultural ContextMI501, MI801
This unit provides the opportunity for cross cultural field research in the context chosen by the college. The student will be required to undertake a group field trip to a cross cultural context of at least 2 weeks and consider among other things the following:

  • The cross cultural issues of the context
  • The ministry practices of the context
  • The worldview distinctives of the context
  • The theological and ministry challenges of the context.
  • The personal impact of cross cultural involvement for life and ministry
The Local Church and MissionMI605, MI705
John Piper states that the Church exists to worship God. But because not all of humankind either knows the Triune God, or worships Him, missions exist to introduce people to their Maker, so that they will worship Him! The local church is central in reaching the world with the Good News of Jesus Christ, and therefore should understand its own identity and task within God’s universal plan.The Bible, and especially the New Testament, gives us a good understanding of the principles of what the Church is, what her role is in reaching the world as well as some principles in missionary methods. This course will begin by focussing on these biblical principles. We shall then move to look at our world today, and how world events and trends has affected in the past, and should change our strategies and methods, in the future.To finish off this unit, we shall move towards a missionary theology for the local church by looking at some of the relevant elements concerned for today and in the future.

Chaplaincy Units

Missional Chaplaincy CP601, CP701

Chaplains serving in a range of caring roles are finding themselves on the forefront of mission. This unit explores the building blocks, both spiritual and practical, for those who wish to serve the missionary goal of the gospel while working as chaplains.

Chaplains have a unique role in the mission of the gospel in Australia. They are engaged in a range of different and varied places such as schools, hospitals, aged care and on the streets in entertainment areas and many other sectors where normal church activities are either non-existent or forbidden.

This unit introduces students to theological and practical streams that make chaplains more effective in mission. It is significantly through the function of caring that chaplains are engaging people with gospel ministry.

The unit includes mission skill training so that students can learn how the love of Christ can open pathways for genuine gospel ministry. Sessions include a theology of mission, especially as it pertains to chaplaincy; an understanding of pastoral care in relation to mission; understanding the way people think, and developing a coherent and practical response to the questions and needs within society.

Chaplaincy Processes CP602, CP702

To be a chaplain is to bring the presence of God into a secular environment. Chaplains are called to present God’s restoring grace as a non-coercive and loving, response to the needs of the people that they engage with outside the context of the church. Chaplains are called to be silent witnesses of Christ’s love to people who may not believe in God, or who may belong to a religion other than Christianity, or who may even be antagonistic to the Christian faith. In times of crisis and despair the chaplain becomes the catalyst for hope and love to break into the situation.

This unit provides a general overview of the key theological and practical principles that apply across the different fields within which a chaplain may be called to minister. Apart from the theological theoretical grounding students will also hear from practitioners operating as chaplains within a wide range of ministry contexts.

Models for Pastoral Counselling CO601, CO701
Pastoral counselling equips us to engage meaningfully with people in the light of the message of the gospel. This unit will present and explore a number of models that are foundational to the understanding and practice of pastoral counselling. They will include psychological, anthropological, theological and counselling theories and models. This will enable students to develop pastoral counselling relationships that are informed, supportive, at times graciously challenging and always hopeful.
Pastoral Counselling as Community Care CO603, CO703
Pastoral counselling does not occur in a vacuum. It occurs in a particular context – a church, a school, a para-church organization or in more specialized agencies. It also exists within particular community and cultural contexts. People’s challenges and struggles also occur within particular contexts. This unit will help the student to develop the understanding and skills needed for pastoral counselling and care in his/her personal ministry in its particular community, cultural and practice context.
Educational Chaplaincy CP501, CP801

This Field Education programme focuses on believers who are called by God to serve as chaplains within an educational context. The unit exposes students to the unique challenges and opportunities relating to working with children and young people as well as the protocols and procedures that pertain to working in a secular educational context.

At Perth Bible College, we believe that academic training that is not thoroughly grounded in the real world of ministry, often leads to the disillusionment and failure of those sent out to serve. Likewise practical skills training without a broad theological framework by which the status quo may be challenged and transformed in the light of the Word of God, leads to stagnation and death. Together with the supervision from the leaders in the field will provide you with a rich and lasting experience, formative for your future ministry for God.

Clinical Pastoral Education CP605, CP705

Chaplains have a unique role in the mission of the gospel both in Australia and in other countries. They are engaged in a range of different and varied areas such as schools, hospitals, aged care facilities, sporting clubs, the Police Service, street service (entertainment and night life) and other sectors.

This unit introduces students to the theological, spiritual and practical streams that make for effective chaplains.

It is designed for all chaplains and uses assignments in the area of street chaplains for the development of experience of ministry.

Chaplains require a broad range of skills which allow them to interact appropriately and offer the love of Christ to people in a variety of situations.